How we redesigned the LINE Developers documentation site

Hi, my name is Kenneth Lau and I’m a technical writer working on the documentation for our developer products here at LINE. As you may have already noticed, we recently released a major update to our LINE Developers site, which provides information about our developer products such as LINE Login and the Messaging API and a developer console for managing your apps. For a quick breakdown of the changes to the site, see our Introducing the redesigned LINE Developers site news post.

In this blog post, I’d like to focus on the changes we’ve made to the technology that runs behind the site and our authoring process for developer documentation. I’ll talk about how we switched to using a static site generator, how this has affected the way we develop docs, and what changes we plan to make in the future. But first, let me give you a brief introduction to the LINE Developers site.

LINE’s Experiences with Chatbots in Asia

Hi, I’m Mark Serrano, a technical consultant for the LINE Platform.
On October 10th, I attended the Business of Bots conference in San Francisco as an invited speaker and panelist. In this blog, I would like to talk about my experience at the conference and also share what I talked about in my session.

The conference

The conference was held at South San Francisco Conference Center in South San Francisco, California. The attendees were from companies in many different industries from hotels, to car companies, and even sports teams. All of them came eager to learn more about chatbots and how to use them to add value to their businesses. Sessions covered an array of topics from best practices for making bots to in-depth case studies of companies that used bots to improve their businesses.

My session

In my session, I talked about some major business use cases for chatbots in LINE’s major markets of Japan, Taiwan, Thailand, and Indonesia. I also outlined what I think the future looks like for chatbots in LINE’s major markets.

LINE DEVELOPER DAY 2017 Recap

Hi, I’m Miki, a technical public relations specialist at LINE Corporation.

On September 28, LINE held a technical conference, LINE DEVELOPER DAY 2017 (DevDay) at Shibuya, Tokyo. DevDay was a huge success with more than 1,000 engineers from within our company and externally in attendance. I would like to once again express my gratitude to all the participants.

This year, we gave the venue a new look and introduced many new ideas, content and events at DevDay. We covered a broad spectrum of topics and more than doubled the number of sessions from 17 last year to 39 sessions this year.

Here, I’d like to share what it was like at DevDay in photos. Hopefully, through these photos, you’ll be able to get a sense of the unique atmosphere at the conference.


Implementing a queue for LINE LIVE PC transmission

Greetings, this is Yappo, in charge of LINE LIVE development. On this blog post, I will introduce a queue for delaying tasks, created for transmitting LINE LIVE service from users’ PC.

How LINE LIVE was broadcasting

We used to have two ways to broadcast LINE LIVE. One is to broadcast directly from the LINE LIVE app and the other is to broadcast from computers. Broadcasting from computers required using the LINE Official Account Manager site and RTMP software (or an exclusive tool). In other words, users were only able to broadcast using the LINE LIVE app, and not PC; only the LINE OA managers have been able to use computers to broadcast.

When you look at the following two sequence diagrams, you would probably think that the implementations for the two transmission types would be completely different. Much to your surprise, the fundamental designs are the same.


LINE Developer Meetup in Fukuoka #18 Firsthand Report


Hi, I’m ha1f, the iOS development engineer for LINE Creators Studio here at LINE Fukuoka. I’ll be giving you a firsthand report of the “LINE Developer Meetup in Fukuoka #18” that took place here in Fukuoka on July 19.

LINE Creators Studio Android with Kotlin / Dave

This session was led by Dave, who has been with the company for two years and until recently was the Android development engineer for LINE Creators Studio. Modern languages / frameworks like Kotlin, Anko, and RxBinding are being used in the development of the Android version of Creators Studio. Dave talked about their advantages and the reasons they were adopted while manipulating code snippets.

LINE and Intertrust Security Summit 2017 Spring, Tokyo 2

Hello, this is Ichihara from the LINE security team. I am in charge of security consultation for LINE services, providing countermeasures for account hacking and abusing, researching authentication technology, and engaging in standardization activities.

Today, I would like to share with you an event titled, “LINE and Intertrust Security Summit 2017 Spring, Tokyo”, co-hosted by LINE and Intertrust on May 17. I will cover this event over two posts; this is the second part of the recap. Have a look at the first part from here

Here is a few basic information of the event.


LINE and Intertrust Security Summit 2017 Spring, Tokyo 1

Hello, this is Ichihara from the LINE security team. I am in charge of security consultation for LINE services, providing countermeasures for account hacking and abusing, researching authentication technology, and engaging in standardization activities.

Today, I would like to share with you an event titled, “LINE and Intertrust Security Summit 2017 Spring, Tokyo”, co-hosted by LINE and Intertrust on May 17. I will cover this event over two posts; this is the first part of the recap. Have a look at the second part from here

Here is a few basic information of the event.


Results From First half of 2017 LINE Security Bug Bounty Program

Scope Expansion

Hi you all, this is MJ (Myoungjae Lee), in charge of security at LINE. I am back with a report on running the LINE Security Bug Bounty Program for the first half of 2017. For those of you who are new to this program, the purpose of this program is to provide LINE users the most secure service possible by letting external security researchers submit bug (vulnerability) reports which we would then immediately fix. Since our official launch of the program on June 2, 2016, we have expanded the program scope to include the following:

  • LINE: Chrome version and Windows 10 Mobile version
  • Website: LINE STORE, LINE NEWS, LINE MUSIC, and LINE LIVE
  • For those of you who are interested, check the press release on the program scope expansion.

Why we use Kotlin in LINE Creators Studio

Before we begin

Hi everyone, I am Freddie Wang from LINE Fukuoka’s development team. I’m currently in charge of developing a new Android app called LINE Creators Studio. LINE Creators Studio is a sticker creation tool that lets anyone create his or her own stickers and sell them on LINE Store.

In this blog, I’d like to talk about Kotlin, the programming language which the LINE Creators Studio app is built on. I will explain why we chose Kotlin as our main language and introduce some of the Kotlin features we are using.

Note: LINE Creators Studio is currently available in Japan only. It will be released to other regions soon.

Advantages and key features of Kotlin

Why Kotlin?

At Google I/O 2017, Google announced that Kotlin is now officially supported in Android Studio 3.0. When we kicked off the development project for LINE Creators Studio at the end of 2016, we were tasked with the challenge of growing it into an MVP (Minimum Viable Product) project in a very short time. Although Kotlin 1.0 had been released quite some time ago, no one in our team had the experience of using Kotlin. We spent some time to conduct a survey on Kotlin before starting the development and eventually decided to use Kotlin because of the benefits it provides as described below.

100% interoperable with Java

The most appealing aspect of Kotlin is that you can mix Kotlin code and Java code in the same project and continue to use all existing Java libraries. Although we don’t have any legacy Java code in our project, we wanted to use some awesome libraries such as Dagger 2, Retrofit, and RxJava.

Concise syntax

Kotlin is designed for solving problems. One of its main goals is to write clean code more easily than Java. This is the first and foremost essential factor for us when developing Android applications.

Reduced dependencies

Kotlin has a compact runtime library which can replace some large Java libraries such as Guava. Using large libraries may not be a problem in server or desktop environments but it can be problematic in Android. Because the Android environment puts 65K methods limit on Android apps, we should avoid using large Java libraries. Kotlin’s stdlib library (version 1.1.3-2) has only 6306 methods, which means it has less impact than the Guava libraries in terms of the number of methods.

Compatible with old Android devices

Kotlin 1.0 is based on Java 6, which means it can support Android devices whose version is 2.3 or higher. This is another very important factor for Android developers.

BigDB – an ad data pipeline for LINE

Before we begin

Hello, we are Jongkyu Lim and Joonghoon Shin responsible for processing of ads data and development of ads platform in LINE. In this blog post, I’d like to talk about BigDB: a big data processing pipeline for LINE ads. I’ll go into detail about how BigDB came to be, what BigDB is, how it’s structured, what it does, and what use cases it has.

How BigDB came to be

As we gather data from various services that are growing in size, the size of the data grows larger as well, making it difficult to properly use them for analysis. Up until now, we’ve used several open solutions that support big data to tackle this problem. While using several of these open solutions that have different strengths and weaknesses, we felt the need for a more simple and standardized way to collect, process, and look up data. And that is where the idea for BigDB began. Below are some of the key features we had in mind for BigDB.

Introducing BigDB

What is BigDB

BigDB is a big data processing pipeline for LINE ads. It can collect, reprocess, and look up data. LINE ads are analyzed in two ways: The first is in real-time whenever an ad is shown to a user. The second is batch analysis, where events are collected and analyzed after a set time, such as hourly or daily. BigDB fluidly provides the data used for analysis. Sometimes combining time series and static data if necessary.